Adobe No Longer Supporting Older Operating Systems – What You Need To Know

Adobe No Longer Supporting Older Operating Systems – What You Need To Know

It has recently been reported that Adobe would no longer be supporting older operating systems with their new release of software. This has naturally led to a number of people wanting to know what operating systems would continue to be supported and what apps would no longer work on older operating systems.

We have dug into this a bit to find some answers for you. The good news is that it is not all doom-and-gloom for those of you who make use Adobe software. If your focus is print and design or photography, you don’t have anything to worry about at this stage. However, If you actively make use of the audio and video tools like Adobe Audition and Premiere Pro, this could affect you.

This snippet from DP Review offers some good insight:

Adobe won’t support older operating systems with its next major Creative Cloud update

If you’re not one to update your computer gear often, you might want to reconsider. Adobe has issued a notice future releases of Creative Cloud programs will no longer support older versions of MacOS and Windows operating systems.

‘As we prepare for our next major release of Creative Cloud, we wanted to share some information on updated operating system requirements,’ says Adobe. ‘To take advantage of the latest operating system features and technologies, the next major release of Creative Cloud will not support Windows 8.1, Windows 10 v1511 and v1607, and Mac OS 10.11 (El Capitan). Most Creative Cloud applications receiving updates in the next major release will still support Windows 7.’

Adobe UpgradeAdobe notes all past and current versions of Creative Cloud applications will continue to work on the aforementioned operating systems. Creative Cloud Desktop — the management application for all Creative Cloud apps — will continue to be supported on Windows 7 or later and MacOS 10.9 (Mavericks) and later. Additionally, Lightroom and Photoshop will continue to support Windows 7 – it’s the company’s audio and video applications like Premiere Pro that will not.

Get the full article here

Here is another related piece from The Digital Picture

Next Round of Creative Cloud Updates to Audio/Video Programs to Drop Support for Older Operating Systems

From Adobe:

As we prepare for our next major release of Creative Cloud, we wanted to share some information on updated operating system requirements. To take advantage of the latest operating system features and technologies, the next major release of Creative Cloud will not support Windows 8.1, Windows 10 v1511 and v1607, and Mac OS 10.11 (El Capitan). For more detailed information about operating system requirements for the next major release of Adobe video and audio tools, see this post.

If you’re running Windows 8.1, Windows 10 v1511 and v1607 or Mac OS 10.11 (El Capitan), you can continue to run and install current and previous versions of Creative Cloud applications. However, you will not be able to install or run the next major release of Creative Cloud unless you’re on a supported version of Windows or MacOS.

Full article here

If you are still unsure about anything or have questions you need answered regarding this, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us.

Photoshop CC Cranks Up ‘The Disappearing Act’ With New Content-Aware Fill

Photoshop CC Cranks Up ‘The Disappearing Act’ With New Content-Aware Fill

Do you remember what it was like to remove unwanted things from photos in Photoshop before they developed the ‘Content Aware’ feature?For those veterans who have been around for a while, you know how time-consuming it was to make these unwanted objects in photos disappear when the best tool in the box was the healing brush. It took days, extreme patience and a whole lot of skill for minor edits. If it was not done with perfect precision, the edits would be noticeable, and your time and effort wasted, leaving you a little beyond frustrated.

Then Adobe developed the content aware feature and suddenly, what might have taken a week now only took a few clicks of a mouse. This feature alone was enough motivation to trade in your Photoshop CS4 for CS5 (yes, this was back in the day). However, this feature, amazing as it is, has been far from perfect.

The problem with the current version of Photoshop CC’s Content-Aware Fill tool is that the process of removing a selected area from an image and replacing it based on its surrounding pixels, is done automatically. This gives us very little control over how the area is replaced so when it insists on filling the area with content we don’t want, we find ourselves once again having to to resort to alternative, time-consuming and tricky methods to achieve the desired results.

However, being the ever-improvising software company that they are, Adobe has been working on this in the background and have managed to take it to a whole new level.. They’ve cranked up their disappearing act by adding awesome new features to the Content-Aware Fill tool, giving you more control and making it easier to blend the filled parts seamlessly with the rest of your image.

This version makes it possible to specify the part of the image you want to use for Content-Aware Fill, giving you the control needed to get the results you want. The path to get to this tool is easier too. Simply Click the Edit tab and select Content-Aware Fill from the dropdown menu. The new easy-to-use interactive workspace features among others, flexible Output options, Rotation Adaption for changing the angle of source pixels, Scale for perspective and Mirroring. Plus, there’s a live preview so you can monitor your edits as you make them.

In short, the new version of Photoshop Content-Aware Fill comes with the promise of a more controlled, simple, time-saving user experience.  But don’t simply take our word for it. Watch this sneak-peak video, released by Adobe on 10 September 2018, to see just how nifty this new improved Content-Aware Fill is. After all, seeing is believing, and once you’ve seen its capabilities, you’re going to be just as excited about its arrival as as we are.

Why We Love Using Frequency Separation in Photoshop to Retouch Headshots

Why We Love Using Frequency Separation in Photoshop to Retouch Headshots

Frequency Separation has been around for a long time but has received a bad reputation in the past. This is not because there is anything wrong with the software. It’s simply because it was used incorrectly by some and taken too far by others.

The purpose of this Adobe tool is to remove any unwanted flaws from skin while keeping it looking natural. However, when people take the flawless part too far, the skin texture ends up looking like plastic because the detail is lost. The trick to using it successfully comes down to the techniques you apply.

The Frequency Separation process is done by separating the detail and texture from the tone and colour of the image, so they can be edited separately. Doing this makes it easier to preserve the details when performing intricate edits, while giving you meticulous control over the tones and colours. Here’s how it’s done:

SET UP:

To begin the process, open the image file in Photoshop and type Cmd/Ctrl-J to duplicate the Background layer.

Duplicate layer:
This layer will be first in the layer stack and will be the high frequency layer. Name it “Detail & Texture”, then click on the visibility icon (the eye) to turn off its visibility for now.

Background layer:
This layer will be the low frequency layer. Change the name to “Colour & Tone”, right-click on it and select the Convert to Smart Object option.

To lightly blur the finer details, apply Gaussian Blur from the Filter menu (Radius: 2 Pixels should be fine).

New layer:
Create a new blank layer before the Colour & Tone layer by typing CMD/Ctrl-Shift-N and call it “Retouch Colour & Tone”.

Detail & Texture layer:
Click the visibility icon of the Detail & Texure layer, select Image > Apply Image to set the layer. (Blending: Subtract, Scale: 2, Offset: 128). Click OK. Now you should have a grey image.

At the top left of the Layers palette, change the blending mode from Normal to “Linear Light”. This will change the grey image back to normal.

RETOUCHING

Colour & Tone (low frequency) Retouching:
Select your Retouch Colour & Tone layer and use the Healing Brush or Clone Stamp tool for brushing over blotches and wrinkles. (Note: In the Tools Option Bar, set the Sample field to Current & Below to ensure that no pixel information is selected from the top layer.)

Detail & Texture (high frequency) Retouching:
Select your Detail & Texture layer. It’s important that you set the Sample field, in the Tools Option Bar, to Current this time. Now you can remove any unwanted details such as blemishes, rough skin textures, blackheads, stray hairs, and so forth, and use the Clone Stamp tool (set Opacity and Flow to 100%) to clone the detail back into these areas.

The ultimate aim of portrait photography is to bring about the true essence of the person being photographed. This is why toning down wrinkles and removing distractions like temporary imperfections is so important. Adobe Photoshop Frequency Separation is the perfect, stream-line tool to achieve this, because it enables users to retouch skin in images faster, without compromising on quality.