Maintain Your Physical and Mental Health During The COVID-19 Quarantine

The unprecedented pandemic that the world is going through at the moment has put an unbelievable strain on people’s lives as they know it. This has resulted in a large change of how people go about living. However, despite the concerns, we must find a way to find the good in this situation. Both our minds and bodies can benefit so long as we use them well and don’t succumb to panic. There are ways for both to be cared for at this time, and some of these ways are what we are going to go over here.

One of the most important things that can benefit people at this time is taking care of our bodies. Exercise has always been important, but now more than ever it can provide a relief from the seemingly endless monotony of working and living from home. Looking to regularly get outside and exercise both benefits your mind and body. These can be anything from walks around the corner or regular runs for distance. If the area around isn’t great for either of those or the weather is not cooperating, then there are plenty of exercises that can be done indoors that help keep you just as fit. Even without exercise equipment like dumbbells, rowing machines or treadmills there are plenty of exercises that can be done in order to regularly get those arms and legs moving. Push-ups, planks, crunches and squats are just some of the exercises that can get the blood flowing without even needing to leave the house. If you don’t even know where to begin in terms of setting up a workout, many gyms and other fitness programs have gone online in order to adjust to the closure of their physical spaces.

Another physical element that can help in this time of stress is sleep. Poor sleep is linked to an increased risk of heart disease which is reason enough to aim for 7-8 hours’ sleep a night at the best of times. Going to bed regularly at the same time and waking up at similar times helps get the body into a sort of flow. This can be achieved by going to bed an hour early and disconnecting from phones or electronics. Just a quiet hour that is spent reading a book can really make falling asleep much easier. Avoiding sleep stimulants like coffee, candy or other sugary foods and drinks also really improves both the length and quality of sleep patterns. Again, exercising during the day can also make sleep that much easier. Good sleep can really make a difference during the day.

Another key aspect of keeping a high level of health during the quarantine has less to do with the physical aspect of the body and more to do with the mental side. There are a good few ways to keep the mind healthy and active during this lockdown.

Intellectual stimulation is one way. Using the large amounts of time that many people now have to pick up a new skill or invest it in some interest that they have had for a while can really pay off on the mind. For example, with the internet growing ever more constant in our lives, the demand for those who are well-versed in a variety of programs is ever growing. The Adobe Creative Cloud apps like Photoshop, InDesign and Premiere Pro are just some examples of programs that employers are looking for. These allow for aspiring editors of photos, websites, magazines and videos to really start down that path while they stay home due to the quarantine.

There are other ways to go about taking advantage of many of the free learning opportunities being offered online at this point in time. The Ivy League schools (Harvard, Princeton, Yale and the like) are all offering free, online courses due to the onset of this pandemic. While one would need to pay to get a “certification” from these courses, that is not actually necessary to take them. These topics can cover such things as religion, programming, personal finance, business finance, politics and more. These can really provide a boost for those who are looking to extend their skills during this quarantine. They provide mental stimulation over a period of time depending on how long the course is. Then, once this quarantine is over and the virus is relatively under control, you will have a new set of skills from one of these college courses. Plus, wouldn’t it be fun to say that you took a class at Harvard?

Of course, this does not just extend to increasing technical skills for the online world. Many interests and skills can be developed at this time. Perhaps a certain period of history has always been interesting to you but there has never been the time to actually explore it on a deeper level, never time to really see the strings and bury yourself into the stories of the period that bring out the fascinating quirks of humans and our interactions with one another. Well now there is plenty of time to increase that knowledge with the help of the many documentaries and history-based YouTube channels that offer an abundance of information for free.

This is obviously a stressful time for many people. It is time to take care of oneself at any cost, with both physical and mental aspects of the person being vital. So, take a moment and think about how the aforementioned health considerations (both physical and mental) could help in this strange time that the world is going through.

Distance Learning Hacks for Students and Educators

Distance Learning Hacks for Students and Educators

Overnight, educators and students around the globe have had to quickly transition from in-class learning to remote home learning. While the transition to distance learning brings rewards, it also brings a unique set of challenges.

“While the route to success might be different from that of studying at a contact institution, the rewards and sense of achievement when you reach your goals are just as significant.” says Sonia Magni, Academic Manager at Oxbridge Academy, a private college that serves more than 20 000 South African distance learning students every year.

“These students do however need all the support they can get, as distance learning can be a lonely and frustrating endeavour if you go about it the wrong way”. Magni says there are a number of distance learning study strategies, which, if applied, will help ensure student success.

Adobe reached out to students and educators to find out what they were doing to stay inspired, connected and productive. Here’s what they had to say – 

“Get dressed and ready every morning as if you’re leaving the house.”

I believe that the environment or learning scenarios, such as the classroom or the classmates around you, help students to switch to ‘focus’ mode. E-learning doesn’t provide that kind of stimulus, and that might be one of the reasons why students find it hard to concentrate or be productive during this online course period. I embedded my previous routine into my current ‘learn-from-home’ life, such as making coffee before starting the day or dressing up as what I normally would do when going to class. Tiara Ping Shia

 

“If you find you’re losing focus, find a new spot to study.”

Ambiance and my surroundings are things I find to be very impactful on the way at which I prepare schoolwork. Being in my bedroom inhibits me from this, so I try to complete my work in different rooms to avoid the temptation of being totally idle. Cyann Camaya

 

“Create a schedule and stick with it.”

Creating a consistent routine that most resembles my on-campus life is what I find to be the most helpful. Exercising in the mornings, spending time outside, and participating in virtual study groups and club meetings normalises the situation. Allyson Maroyka

 

“Alternate between doing your homework and doing the things you love.”

The switch from in-person instruction to online classes has been a stressful and daunting task for most students. I find that taking walks outside as the weather gets warmer helps me regain a sense of normalcy during these troubling times.  Vasu Garg

 

“Take regular breaks.”

I find it tough to concentrate for a long period of time, so it’s important to give yourself breaks every hour or so. And I always shut off my phone when I do work. It’s extremely distracting. Brandon Kalika

 

“Get a good workout in every day.”

Too much screen time tends to give me a headache, which lowers my productivity considerably. I try to ensure that I stay active and hydrated by always having water nearby and try to fit in some level of activity each day. Jenna Minks

 

“Find a way to limit phone use.”

Getting distracted on your phone during class is way easier now than when you used to go to an actual school. Find a way to limit your usage because that device can destroy the schedule you’ve crafted so well. Emile Redlinger

 

“Find a hobby that taps into your creative side.”

It’s been a transition for everyone, but we all find our ways of coping. Personally, at the beginning I started to fall into cycles of negative thinking without realising. Thankfully, this changed when I started taking each day as an opportunity to do something positive, and I would always have something to look forward to doing. I found that exercise has helped tremendously, as well as doing something creative. Harry Wiley

 

As the world navigates this unprecedented health crisis, educators and learners are learning to adapt and move forward. In the face of all this change, Learning Curve are fully committed to helping schools, colleges and universities, teachers, faculty, and learners make the shift to online learning one of the easiest and simplest decisions.

We’re inspired by the ideas and resources educational leaders are sharing with each other during this time. To continue the conversation and connect with us drop us an email or connect with us on Facebook