Adobe Announces The Update to the Lightroom Ecosystem We’ve Been Waiting For!

Today, Adobe announced updates to the Lightroom ecosystem, including GPU-accelerated editing in Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw, providing a smoother and more responsive experience. Finally! (And hopefully) the update we’ve been waiting for since long before the Creative Cloud subscription service came into play. If this works as well as i’m hoping, I’ll officially stop complaining as much as I have been! (trust me, anyone who has to work in close proximity knows my woes with LR processing speeds).

In Adobe’s official August Photography Update the details say they’ve focused on “Performance and improving your workflow” adding several minor improvements and additions listed below. At the time of this write up and release, we’ve not been able to get hands on directly with the application so we can’t confirm these improvements yet, but believe me, I’ll be downloading and running tests on this as soon as it’s available and will update accordingly! I’ll time a random batch edit and export tonight to compare it to the updated version once it’s live.

This update is supposed to enhance your workflow by finally taking advantage or GPU acceleration, allowing Lightroom to leverage your video cards while editing, giving you a “smoother and more responsive experience.” According to the blog post, the performance enhancements will be most noticeable if you’re using…Read more

Adobe promises faster Lightroom photo editing thanks to GPU chip

PC graphics processors are being put to new use in the latest release of Lightroom Classic.

Adobe Lightroom Screenshot

Lightroom Classic lets photographers edit and catalog photos. Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Adobe’s Lightroom, long dogged by complaints it’s grown sluggish at editing and organizing photos, got a performance boost Tuesday by tapping into the processing power of the graphics chip in Windows and Mac computers.

The August release of Lightroom Classic should speed up editing and make the software more responsive in general, said Josh Haftel, principal product manager at Adobe, in a blog post. The benefits will be more pronounced on high-resolution monitors and with fast graphics chips, he said, but didn’t quantify the improvement.

Lightroom can handle common photo formats like JPEG, but it’s best suited for people who tap into higher-end cameras’ ability to shoot in raw photo formats. Those preserve more details, color and dynamic range, but require you to put in some work making them into a presentable, shareable form. And it’s a lot of work for computers to handle those raw photos, too, so performance boosts are crucial.

Lightroom had used the GPU earlier, so what’s new this time? Here’s what Haftel told me:

The most recent improvements to GPU acceleration are targeted at improving the performance while editing. That means the improvements will be seen while moving the editing sliders. We’re working on improving the GPU acceleration for rendering images, such as on export. No timeline can be shared at this time.

He also said Adobe is working to bring more GPU acceleration to other versions of Lightroom besides Classic. For details on using it, check Adobe’s instructions on enabling Lightroom GPU acceleration.

Adobe has several Lightroom incarnations: the full-featured Lightroom Classic, which is the renamed version of the original software for Macs and Windows machines; Lightroom, which also works on PCs, relies on cloud-based photo storage and lacks some Classic features; the related Lightroom for the web; and mobile versions for Android and iOS phones and tablets….Read more

Lightroom will finally become faster as Adobe announces GPU-accelerated editing

Lightroom CC

If there’s one thing most Lightroom users agree about, it’s that the program could use a speed boost. In its latest announcement, Adobe introduces GPU-accelerated editing in Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw. It should make the editing process smoother and make the programs faster and more responsive.

Adobe announced the upcoming improvements on its blog. There are several new features coming in the latest update, but the GPU-accelerated editing is certainly the most interesting one. Adobe writes that this feature lets Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw provide a “smoother and more responsive experience.”

Adobe Lightroom CC

As I mentioned, there are a few other improvements to Lightroom ecosystem. They allow you to:

  • Batch merge for HDR and panoramas (Lightroom Classic).
  • Download edits found on Discover posts as presets by tapping on the three-dot menu at the top of each post, afterward head to your preset library to start applying them to your images (Lightroom for mobile, iOS and Android).
  • Recover deleted photos on the device you’re using (free users) and any devices connected to your account (premium subscriptions) (Lightroom Ecosystem).
  • Use color labels to organize your collections, collection sets and smart collections (Lightroom Classic).
  • Export your photos as PNGs (Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw)…Read more

 

Adobe Announces Numerous New Features for Lightroom Including Deleted Photo Recovery, Presets From Discover, More

Adobe today announced numerous new features for Lightroom Classic, Camera Raw, Lightroom for Mac and Windows, Lightroom for iOS, and Lightroom for Android.

Here’s a brief overview of what’s new:

Improvements to Lightroom Classic & ACR
● GPU Accelerated Editing (Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw)
Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw take advantage of the more powerful graphics cards (GPUs) while editing, providing a smoother and more responsive experience. GPU acceleration is more pronounced with larger resolution monitors (4k and above) as well as with more powerful GPUs.

● PNG export support (Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw)
The PNG file format is a popular uncompressed file format often used on the web. Lightroom and Camera Raw have supported importing and opening PNG-based files for some time, and now you can export your photos as PNGs.

● Library Module Improvements (Lightroom Classic)
As part of our on-going effort to improve speed and performance in Lightroom Classic, significant improvements were made to the Library module while browsing folders.

● Color Labels for Collections (Lightroom Classic)
Color labels have long been used in Lightroom Classic as a way to quickly visualize different groups of photos and recently we made it possible to add color labels to folders. In this update, we added the ability to also add color labels to Collections. Find what you’re looking for faster by adding color labels to collections, collection sets, and smart collections.

● Batch Merge for HDR, Panoramas, and HDR Panoramas (Lightroom Classic)
Batch processing is a great way to speed up your workflow by helping you gang up processor-intensive efforts and letting your computer do the heavy lifting without having to wait for each task to be done. The August release of Lightroom Classic makes it possible to batch process HDR and panorama merges. To batch merge, first make a stack of each HDR or pano that you want to merge (make sure that you’re selecting like stacks, all HDR or all pano merges, without mixing up the two types). Then, select each stack you want to merge and select the appropriate option from the Photo > Photo Merge menu.
Lightroom CC new features
New Features Throughout the Lightroom Ecosystem
● Recover Deleted Photos (Lightroom for Mac, Windows, iOS, Android, ChromeOS, and lightroom.adobe.com)
A new Deleted folder is now available in all Lightroom apps, making it possible to recover photos that were accidentally deleted for up to 60 days. If you’re using a free version of Lightroom, you can recover your photos on the device on which they were deleted. If you’re a Creative Cloud member or have a Premium subscription, you can recover deleted photos on any device connected to your account.

● Create Presets From Discover Posts (Lightroom for iOS, Android, and ChromeOS)
Discover posts were introduced in the May 2019 release and allow you to see the edit process applied to a photo. Now you can turn those edits into a preset that you can apply to any of your photos. Tap to open a Discover post and then tap on the three-dot menu at the top-right and select Download as Preset. You’ll be able to find that new preset named after the Discover post within your preset library.

● Improved Search Options (Lightroom for iOS, Android, and ChromeOS)
Three new auto-complete search tools were added to Lightroom for iOS, Android, and ChromeOS (these tools were already available in Lightroom for Windows and Mac) making it easier than ever to find the exact photo you’re looking for. You can now search for photos shot with a specific focal length, for raw, HDR, or pano photo types, and… Read more

Adobe updates Camera Raw and Lightroom, adding GPU acceleration

Adobe has released a slew of updates to Camera Raw and Lightroom Classic, all focused on improving performance and workflow.

Adobe Lightroom Updates

Image Credit: Adobe

Creative suite developer Adobe has rolled out several improvements to Camera Raw and Lightroom Classic, their desktop-centric photography programs. The updates add new functionality and overall improvement to’performance.

Both Lightroom and Camera Raw now feature GPU Accelerated Editing, giving users the ability to utilize more powerful graphic cards to provide a smoother and more responsive experience. The better the GPU, the better the experience, and the effects will be most noticeable on monitors that feature a 4K resolution or higher.

Perhaps one of the most requested additions —the ability to export images as PNG files —has been added to both Camera Raw and Lightroom. While both apps have been able to open and edit PNG-based files, users have had to export as JPEGs, PSDs, TIFFs, and DNGs. Now users can utilize the popular, uncompressed PNG file format.

Adobe Lightroom Updates

Image Credit: Adobe

Lightroom classic sees significant improvements in the library module while browsing folders, and users can now assign color labels to groups of photos. This gives users the ability to tell what photos are in a specific group at a glance. Color labels can be applied to collections, collection sets, and…Read more