Adobe Photoshop CC for iPad is appearing soon! But will it be worth the wait…?

We’ve been waiting for Adobe Photoshop CC for iPad for months, but it looks like it’s FINALLY coming

Chatter about when Adobe Photoshop CC for iPad might finally arrive have been growing steadily louder over the past year, but it looks as if we might finally have an answer. The word on the digital street is that Photoshop for iPad will be out before the end of the year.

However, following a Bloomberg report on the consumer launch of Adobe Photoshop CC for iPad, it looks as if there will be some key features lacking from the desktop version in the iPad application.

In Bloomberg’s article, an anonymous beta-tester for the software said, “Feature-wise, it feels like a beefed-up cloud-based version of their existing iPad apps and not ‘real Photoshop’ as advertised. I understand it is based on desktop Photoshop code, but it doesn’t feel like it right now.”

This is likely to be disappointing to photographers who have been patiently awaiting the “real” Photoshop that was described when Adobe Photoshop CC for iPad was first announced. However, John Gruber from Daring Fireball has an interesting take on the situation. “The mistake Adobe made was not precisely setting expectations for the initial release of Photoshop for iPad… “Full” Photoshop… was never the plan…

“Photoshop for iPad is real because it is using the same code base that’s been running on the desktop for decades. That’s an amazing technical accomplishment. Photoshop for iPad is not full – and the initial release was never planned to be – because it only exposes a subset of features from the desktop version.”

John goes on to say that because Adobe Photoshop CC for iPad is built on the real Photoshop core, there will be complete compatibility with PSD files exchanged with the desktop versions of Photoshop. He also reasons that once the first version of the software is complete, new features will be fast and free-flowing. This is because the core rendering and functionality at a foundational level will have been built to last for a decade or more.

John adds that apparently Adobe’s team of engineers working on this project have plans to add features on an “aggressive schedule” once Photoshop for iPad has been launched, so expect to see an exciting 2020 for Adobe…Read more

When will Adobe release Photoshop for iPad?

First announced in 2018, Adobe has been working on a version of Photoshop CC for the iPad for more than a year, and the release could be just around the corner.

Recently, Bloomberg offered an update on the software, telling photographers and designers that Adobe was “committed’ to releasing Photoshop for iPad by the end of 2019.

Now, Daring Fireball‘s John Gruber has shared some new insights into Adobe’s software plans.

“The team of engineers working on it has grown significantly from a year ago, and they have plans to add features iteratively on an aggressive schedule,” he said.

“It’s reasonable to be disappointed that it isn’t further along feature-count-wise, but anyone who cares about Photoshop for ‌iPad‌ as a long-term product should be very excited about its foundation, direction, and the attention Adobe is paying to the fine details of a touch-first Photoshop UI.

According to beta testers, the initial Photoshop for iPad release was limited and missed several core Photoshop features, so Adobe has been working hard to live up to the reputation its software has on the desktop.

Although they won’t be able to offer a “full” version of Photoshop for professionals, they are working hard to add as many new features as possible.

“Photoshop for ‌iPad‌ is real because it is using the same code base that’s been running on the desktop for decades,” Gruber added.

“That’s an amazing technical accomplishment.

“Photoshop for ‌iPad‌ is not full – and the initial release was never planned to be – because it only exposes a subset of features from the desktop version.”

When Photoshop does launch on the iPad, users will be able to open and edit PSD files for cross-platform functionality, and features such as custom brushes, fonts, swatches, curve adjustment, smart objects, grids, guidelines and more will be added in a future update…Read more

Adobe ‘Aggressively’ Working on Photoshop for iPad

Photoshop for the iPad has been in the works for about a year now, and as it nears its release, there have been reports that it will be missing key features. Nonetheless, sources say that Adobe is “genuinely all-in” on the app and that it will quickly work to fill out the program.

John Gruber of Daring Fireball cites multiple sources saying that Adobe is on an “aggressive schedule” with Photoshop for iPad, and although they may not release it with a full feature set, that will be coming in short time in iterative updates. A recent report from Bloomberg noted that the upcoming version was missing essentials, including filters, the Pen Tool, raw editing, and more. Of course, these (particularly support for raw files) are absolutely essential if Adobe hopes to position Photoshop for iPad as a legitimate tool for photographers, and it seems they do intend to do just that, with the engineering team for the project having grown quite a bit in the last year. …Read more

Inside Adobe Spectrum, the design system making apps like Photoshop on iPad possible

Today, Adobe is opening up new resources for designers and developers with the launch of an official website for its company-wide design system, Spectrum. From the new Creative Cloud desktop application for Mac to the next iPad edition on iPad, Spectrum gives Adobe applications their distinct appearance.

Before Adobe MAX, next month, Shawn Cheris, director of Adobe’s design experience, told us a little bit about the spectrum. As applications such as Lightroom, Fresco and, soon, Photoshop become key products of Adobe’s range of mobile tools, it is more important than ever to have an experience consistent across all platforms.

The Spectrum project started in 2013, long before Adobe officially introduced the design system to the public with a blog post in May 2018. When the Cheris team refined the principles behind Spectrum , new products and existing Adobe teams have begun to adopt the system.

“Spectrum’s core tenants must be” rational, human, and focused. “In practice, this means trying to reduce the user experience to its simplest possible state,” says Cheris. Adobe teams adhere to Dieter Rams’ famous idea that good design is “as small as possible”.

Lightroom has a similar design and workflow on Macs, iPads and iPhones.

The search for simplicity brings new challenges when you try to reinterpret decades of designing desktop applications (built with keyboards and mouse in mind) on new platforms such as iPad OS . The spectrum is the starting point. “When platforms have a positive perspective on certain interactions, we use the convention that users are likely to expect,” says Cheris. “The ideal is to try to follow the best practices on each platform while making those familiar experiences to users who use our products across multiple platforms.” It’s a difficult balance we’re still working on. ”

Adobe designers try to support cross-platform design for each component in the Spectrum library, such as buttons and icons. The best ideas created by Adobe teams outside the system are integrated. Spectrum was also an opportunity for Adobe to make a critical investment in accessible design. Each component of the system complies with Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 and Adobe works on compliance 2.1.

Adobe Fresco and Photoshop on the pre-edition interface of the iPad (in the foreground) are cut in the same fabric.

You may have noticed that the latest Adobe applications on iPadOS share a similar user interface. Fresco borrows from Lightroom. Both Photoshop and Fresco offer a customizable hot key. It’s not by accident. “Spectrum has provided answers to many questions relating to the user interface and the user experience (in Photoshop on iPad), from interface components to color systems, and helped unify and coordinate those answers in many simultaneous application design efforts, “says Ryan Hicks, Photoshop Lead Designer for iPad. Adobe has tried to balance Photoshop’s legacy with innovative ideas of modern touch devices to create a product that is both familiar and new.

“Part of what Spectrum is supposed to accomplish is actually to provide a more modern experience,” adds Cheris. “And” modern “almost always means that you have to be a little different from anything that has been done before.” …Read more